Wednesday, February 20, 2013

Easy Hot Pad Tutorial


The other day I needed a quick gift for a friend and decided I’d make a couple of hot pads / pot holders for her.  These are a quick project and make a nice gift because you can completely customize the fabrics to fit the chef!
 
Easy Hot Pad Tutorial from The Fabric Mill's blog
(fabric used is Serenata from Riley Blake)


Easy Hot Pad Tutorial
by
Andy Knowlton


Materials Needed (for two hot pads)
1/4 yard each of two complimentary fabrics OR 2 fat quarters
1/6 yard coordinating fabric for binding
1/4 yard Insul-Bright**
two 9”x 9” pieces of thin cotton batting

**Insul-Bright is a thin batting-like material that has an insulating layer.  It is made for items such as this.  In the photo you can just barely see the thin insulating layer (where the red arrow is pointing.)  The Fabric Mill carries Insul-Bright!

Insul-Bright

Step 1:  Cut two 8.5” squares from each coordinating fabric.

Easy Hot Pad Tutorial from The Fabric Mill's blog

Then cut (about) 9” squares of the thin cotton batting and the Insul-Bright (you’ll need two of each)

Easy Hot Pad Tutorial from The Fabric Mill's blog

The rest of the instructions will be for just one hot pad but your supplies will be enough to make two. 

Step 2:  Layer the fabrics and the batting to create a sandwich:   fabric 1 (right side down), Insul-Bright, thin cotton batting, fabric 2 (right side up)

Pin layers together in 4 to 6 places to hold together.

Easy Hot Pad Tutorial from The Fabric Mill's blog

Step 3:  Quilt the layers together.  You can do either some straight line quilting, or some free motion quilting.  I like the look of the straight line quilting but the fmq goes a bit quicker for me.

Once the quilting is done trim the hot pad.

Easy Hot Pad Tutorial from The Fabric Mill's blog


Step 4:  From the binding fabric cut 1 strip that is 2.5” x width of fabric.  Fold it in half and press to make a long strip that is 1.25” wide.

Easy Hot Pad Tutorial from The Fabric Mill's blog
(Each binding strip will bind one hot pad)

Step 5:  Place the binding strip along one side of the hot pad with the folded edge pointing toward the center of the hot pad and the raw edge of the binding strip matching up with the edge of the hot pad. 

Easy Hot Pad Tutorial from The Fabric Mill's blog

Start sewing (1/4” seam) about 1.5” from the corner of the hot pad.  Stop when you get to 1/4” from the edge.  Backstitch.  Clip threads.

Easy Hot Pad Tutorial from The Fabric Mill's blog

Fold the binding strip to the right so that it is perpendicular to where you were just sewing:


Easy Hot Pad Tutorial from The Fabric Mill's blog

then fold it back on itself to the left so it lines up with the next edge of the hot pad:

Easy Hot Pad Tutorial from The Fabric Mill's blog

Turn the hot pad 90 degrees and begin sewing the next side (1/4” seam.)  Start right at the edge and backstitch just a little as you begin:


Easy Hot Pad Tutorial from The Fabric Mill's blog

Sew all the way down this side, stopping again 1/4” from the end and repeating the above steps for the corner.

Continue all the way around the hot pad:

Easy Hot Pad Tutorial from The Fabric Mill's blog


After sewing the final corner, sew down the last side only about 1.5”, then backstitch.  Remove hot pad from machine, clip threads.  On that last side, you should have about 5 or 6 inches with no binding yet:

Easy Hot Pad Tutorial from The Fabric Mill's blog

Next we need to join the two ends of the binding.  Lay the binding down and unfold it just a little so you can mark where they meet up. 

Easy Hot Pad Tutorial from The Fabric Mill's blog


Pin in place

Easy Hot Pad Tutorial from The Fabric Mill's blog


Carefully sew across the two binding ends to join them.

Easy Hot Pad Tutorial from The Fabric Mill's blog

Trim extra binding off, leaving about 1/4”:

Easy Hot Pad Tutorial from The Fabric Mill's blog

Lay binding down on edge of hot pad, finger pressing the seam you just created. 

Easy Hot Pad Tutorial from The Fabric Mill's blog

Sew in place.

Step 6:  Beginning in the middle of one side, flip the binding over to the back so that it covers the stitching line.  Hold in place with pins or binding clips.  Sew on the other side, right in the ditch.  This will catch the folded edge of the binding on the opposite side. 

Easy Hot Pad Tutorial from The Fabric Mill's blog

When you get to the corner, stop about 2” from the corner.  Leaving the needle and the presser foot down, fold up the corner so you can see the underside.  Fold the binding down as shown:

Easy Hot Pad Tutorial from The Fabric Mill's blog

Then fold the other side over as shown to create the corner.  Hold in place as you sew to the corner, leave the needle down, pivot and continue sewing down the next edge of the hot pad. 



Easy Hot Pad Tutorial from The Fabric Mill's blog

Continue sewing around until binding is sewn. 

Easy Hot Pad Tutorial from The Fabric Mill's blog


Enjoy your hot pads!  I LOVE mine.  When they need a wash just toss them in with your dish towels. 

Easy Hot Pad Tutorial from The Fabric Mill's blog



22 comments:

  1. I love the look of quilted pot holders. These are just adorable with your lovely fabrics.

    I pretty much make them the same way, but save myself some effort by starting the binding right at the corner and making a simple loop with the leftover binding to finish. (Showed this in a blog--look for the Christmas tree: http://quiltscapesquilting.blogspot.com/2012/08/thinking-christmas-blog-hop-giveaway.html

    These are very cute with pieced/quilted orphan blocks, and also make great gifts.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Lovely pot holders. Thanks for the tute.:-)

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  6. Thank you for this! Enjoyed it!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Many thanks for this comprehensive yet simple tute for potholders. They have been my go-to gift for years. Started a million years ago with a loop loom and can still remember my mom using them preferentially over the decades. (Wonder if younger sis got them when she emptied the folks' place last year?) Now I use "made" fabric and Insul-Bright; my friends buy them off the wall in my kitchen if they wee one they especially like !~! What a Huge Compliment it is too !~!

    Your fabric choice is inspired in this post. Thanks again for the tutorial.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oops... If the SEE one, not Wee on one !~! Maybe someday I'll proofread better; thanks for your delightful blog.

      Delete
  8. Thanks for the tutorial. Also, a big thanks for not having all the ads all over the page. Makes it easy to print and save.

    ReplyDelete
  9. This is the dumbest question ever, but is there a "right" and "wrong" side when using the pot holder because the insul-bright is on one side? Would you notice a difference in the heat transfer depending on which side you are holding? Great tutorial!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I just bought some and the packaging says there is not a wrong side. Both sides are equally heat resistant.

      Delete
    2. I was thinking the same thing, because the batting might melt?! I'm a novice as well.

      Delete
  10. I'm just a beginner at making potholders but they're the reason I wanted to learn to sew.....are you using one or two layers of insul-bright? I made a few potholders with only one layer but find they're a but thin for really hot pots!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Hi kd,
    I use a layer of cotton or polyester batting as a second layer cuz I too have found one layer of Insulbrite to be insufficient. The batting is much cheaper than the Insulbrite and it's thick enough to keep the heat from getting thru. Batting and quilting the sides individually solves the "too thin" problem also.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. But the cotton batting catches on fire. So what's the purpose of the one piece of insulbrite and the one piece of cotton batting. Why not use two pieces of insulbrite

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  12. Hi Lynda! Ok, so I'm going to end up with 4 layers.....(1)fabric, (2)insulbrite, (3)batting & (4)fabric? I've been using quilt fabric scraps but I find that they're too nice, I don't want to get them dirt, is there a better fabric to use? I've been asked to make them out of a very thick, short threaded terry cloth but can't find that anywhere, any suggestions? Thank you! kd

    ReplyDelete
  13. Hi, you say 1/6 yard of fabric for binding. I looked that up in inches and it says it's 6", surely that can't be right? Thanks

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 6 inches = length of fabric. Most are 45" wide. 45" would give you 90 inches of 2-1/2" wide strips. The circumference of the 9" square is 36". Therefore there is more than enough to bind 2 pot holders, and have a 45" strip 1" wide left over.

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  14. Is there a recommended outer fabric?

    ReplyDelete
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